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Gallery Tour

Gallery Tour(under reference)
Gallery

Gallery  Map - 팝업

  • 5 floor

    1. Han Jin-Seob [Standing girl and boy sculpture]

    1. Han Jin-Seob [Standing girl and boy sculpture]

    Han Jin-Seob’s work closely describes the forms hidden in the surface patterns while enduring physical labor and slow-moving time while crafting stone. His works sometimes feel like being with a long-forgotten friend, or visiting a hometown you’ve been away from for so long, but where peace resides and awaits you. His works are also accessible to those unfamiliar with art, making them smile and bringing them comfort. Maybe that’s because his theme is the universality of being human.

    * Standing girl sculpture: 40x39x158cm | 1990

    * Standing boy sculpture: 44x38x167cm | 1990

    2. Park Young-Nam [Gogh&Mondrian V, VI]

    2. Park Young-Nam [Gogh&Mondrian V, VI]

    Park Young-Nam uses his fingers as a painting tool. He first pours different colored paint on the canvas and mixes them manually. The acrylic paint he uses starts to dry after about 15 minutes, and hardens after half an hour, at which point his painting gains speed and he moves his fingers more rapidly to paint. Leaving the body to move repeatedly with a natural rhythm brings a very pleasant feeling. Fragments of paints splashed from the fingertips become alternately stagnated, scraped, or washed away. Park Young-Nam once said that the property of paints that doesn’t allow modifying past traces seem similar to his life.

    * Gogh&Mondrian V 163x227cm | 1990

    * Gogh&Mondrian VI 163x227cm | 1990

    3. Kim Chang-Yeol [Water drop]

    3. Kim Chang-Yeol [Water drop]

    It’s like the water drops are on the paper are real, inexplicably enchanting the viewers at first sight. For Kim Chang-Yeol, water drops stand for self-purification. He suffered during the Korean War at age 20, and the drops purify those terrible scars of from that time. The drops also stand for agony of modern humans – the water drops filling the screen represent the desire to escape from reality, as well as the people who have to stay within, plus the great transitions in our lives.

    * 195x100cm | 1998

    4. Choi Jong-Tae [Face]

    4. Choi Jong-Tae [Face]

    Sculpting equates to the process of birth, and the mindset of sculpting to give birth to the final piece represents the pursuit of truth. Sharply crafted faces in the midst of simple but daring lines provide equilibrium to the whole work. His works are about faces only, and the minimalistic forms of his work lead to new shapes in the geometric structures. Additionally, those faces, derived from the girl’s statue and especially preferred by the artist himself, contain the push and pull of his love and agony within art.

    * 87x42x13cm | 1991

    5. Yu Ui-Rang [Flowers and Trees]

    5. Yu Ui-Rang [Flowers and Trees]

    His “Moonlight” calms the surroundings with delicate descriptions of mundane subjects. Bright colors, decorative patterns and meticulous movements of the brush all work together to closely unite minute and delicate factors to create a rich story. His preferred subjects include the offerings of our daily lives, such as tables, fruit, baskets, hats, curtains, glass jars, purses, etc. Our life has a future and hope because of how much we value such mundane objects. In this regard, His works are beautiful.

    * 180x300cm | 1990

    6. Hyun Hye-Sung [Sea Story]

    6. Hyun Hye-Sung [Sea Story]

    Nature is breathing in his works. Despite the coldness of marble, his sculptures somehow delivery warm temperatures like the human body. It can be said that his works reflect the hope and frustration from his studies abroad, as well as his own strength that grows with each critical situation. The softness and hardness of marble are both maximized while the artist’s sensibility stays in harmony, creating a unison of sharpness and tenderness.

    * 50x20x50cm | 1990

    7. Kim Dong-Woo [Performing lover]

    7. Kim Dong-Woo [Performing lover]

    Standing as one with a cello, which is known to have the closest sound to that of humans, this statue of a woman delivers the warmth of her heart. Built with white marble from Italy, this work boasts its great finish with a combination of the soft curves of the human body and that of the cello. The love that Kim Dong-Woo feels and knows seems to be the most primitive and humane. The muscular arms and huge hands in his works serve as the shield that protects his kind of love. A story of a human will never lose its draw.

    * 33x25x56cm | 1989

    8. Arman [Bayadere (Dancer)]

    8. Arman [Bayadere (Dancer)]

    This masterpiece of Armand Pierre Fernandez in 1984 well represents his Orientalism. He is one of the most popular artists in Nouvo Realism in France, and creates works by stacking up plastic or resin-based consumable products that are manufactured and consumed on a daily basis, and cutting and burning them. He became fascinated with musical instruments like the piano, violin, saxophone, etc., which also served as materials for his art, because he believed that such works were the best rendition of his internal voices.

    * 66x37x20cm | 1984

    9. Salvador Dali [Space Venus]

    9. Salvador Dali [Space Venus]

    The genius is well known for strange behavior that even got him kicked out of the association of surrealism artists, but he managed to view the world of unconsciousness from reality. He expressed the world of dream or fantasy in the subconscious, or “resonance” from the psychoanalytic theory of Sigmund Freud in his pictures. His painting method, that even he referred to as ‘monomaniac and critical’ results from his intention to express strange and unreasonable hallucination with objectivity and realism.

    * 34x35x66cm | 1988

    10. Kim Heung-Joo [Untitled]

    10. Kim Heung-Joo [Untitled]

    This artist brings the conflicting factors of familiarity and unfamiliarity simultaneously. With just one flower or even a leaf filling the screen, the flower strays from being a part of that screen, but attempts to coincide with it. Kim says that his work is completed not in the overall structure, but in the numerous and minute details. In addition, the meaning of his work doesn’t lie only within the picture itself, but also should be experienced in the space where it is displayed, its relations to other pictures, and context of the viewer in order to be meaningful.

    * 230x230cm | 1999

    11. Ahn Byung-Suk [The wind]

    11. Ahn Byung-Suk [The wind]

    Ahn Byung-Suk is an artist using bluish impression that resembles nature. It’s been said that “Nature is the mirror reflecting humans.” We tend to behave in more modest ways and solemnly look back on ourselves, and then find the strength to go back to daily life with a completely purified mind. The artist visualizes the existence of ‘Wind’ with the shape of swaying grass. The work represents the introspection about our existence. He attempts to tell us that, like the wind that moves grass but remains invisible, all operations of consciousness are our reality.

    * 294x330cm | 1988

    12. Jun Gook-Gwang [Origin of Life]

    12. Jun Gook-Gwang [Origin of Life]

    Reviews about his works say that they logically represent longing for nature, and he manages to express the innate power and spirit of nature. Jun Gook-Gwang decided to take his own life at the regretful age of 46, but lived as an artist who pursued immortal goals through his works like a boy who was after the impossible and the infinite. Inside his works and themes, there are still numerous questions and answers swirling around.

    * 320x210x170cm

    13. Bang Hye-Ja [Light of Cell 1, 2]

    13. Bang Hye-Ja [Light of Cell 1, 2]

    The artist intends to feel the space and contain its depth in her works. The painting promotes a feeling of meditation, and the calmly sinking world feels similar to the sea that the artist pursues. The flat surface accidentally created by the excessive crumpling of paper, along with the composition that exists yet doesn’t seem to be there, shows the possibility of infinite changes.

    * 294x330cm | 1988

  • 5 floor

    16. Lee Il-Ho [Color is in vain]

    16. Lee Il-Ho [Color is in vain]

    Lee’s works give impressions of a legend and even a myth, and combined fantasy-like factors and structural will. He floats around time and space freely and also dives into the inner world of people without limitations, resulting in a richer realization of imagination. From a certain perspective, it can be said that his works deliver stories drawn up from deep inside people’s consciousness. Lee utilizes the deepest scenes of human consciousness such as sexual desire, narcissism, return to essence, etc. as specific themes.

    * 118x50x50cm

    17. Lee Wal-Jong [Middle path of life]

    17. Lee Wal-Jong [Middle path of life]

    A wild rose for lovers, a camellia flower for pleasure-hunters, a bird for haters, a television for sufferers, a fish for pursuers of hope and peace… He prefers materials for Oriental painting, but embraces both eastern and western styles in his works, while boldly utilizing ideas from folk paintings. For the artist, the world of halfway means the process of uniting conflicting emotions in the back of people’s minds such as love and hate, joy and despair.

    * 200x210cm

    18. Hyun Hye-Sung [Scent of inner mind]

    18. Hyun Hye-Sung [Scent of inner mind]

    Two similar shapes form bilateral symmetry and create an oval, which inside is split into two. The surface is not smooth but is covered with oblique cuts. His skillful technique with stones makes the material speak for itself with overt expression, and seems to provide feelings like the inner sound from deep breathing and organic life.

    * 294x330cm | 1988

    19. Chun Byung-Hun [Enemy-1998]

    19. Chun Byung-Hun [Enemy-1998]

    The artist discovered the beauty of “Five Cardinal Colors” - red, blue, yellow, black and white - on the Korean jacket of his mother, which was dyed with safflowers. During his long stay in Paris (1984-1991), his longing for oriental art got stronger. To differentiate his works from those of western artists, he applies a unique process of paint scratching on the picture. An escape from the old method of adding colors on the cloth, the scratching is repeated until the depth of time and subtle beauty are found from faded colors.

    * 300x140cm | 1998

    21. Yu Ri-Ji [Market for resting space]

    21. Yu Ri-Ji [Market for resting space]

    Being more popular as a metal crafter than from her original job of professor, Yu Ri-Ji is an artist with determination to “overthrow stereotypes about metal”. She converts common scenery objects such as the sea, lake, sky, wind, wave, cloud, bird, moon, and more, into abstract but lyrical “sculpture language”. The artist also transforms daily life scenes into sculptures where she can express her interpretation of a subject naturally by maximizing pure sculptural elements.

    * 880x660cm | 1996

    22. Park Dae-Sung [Ilchulbong]

    22. Park Dae-Sung [Ilchulbong]

    Works of Park Dae-Sung, who is renowned for exploring new possibilities with “literary artist paintings”, inherits the spirit of traditional art while displaying a sense of modern sculpture. In particular, he emphasizes the realistic description of subject scenery so much when painting landscapes of Korea that he’s been called “a modern master of realistic art”. The Ilchulbong mountain towering behind windy reed forest and low wooden fences with broken corners in his pictures remind us of old and heart-warming hometown memories.

    * 236x137.5cm | 1989

    23. Han Jin-Seob [New born]

    23. Han Jin-Seob [New born]

    Since his days at Hongik University, Han Jin-Seob stock with stone sculptures with focus on humans. Combining the modernity of western sculptures and traditional characteristics of Korean art, he created modern and Korean sculpture styles. At a glance, his works appear so natural and easy-to-make, but on a more complicated level they also provide the warmth of humans with cold stone pieces, as well as composure and humor, two main characteristics of Korean art.

    * 294x330cm | 1988

    24. Han Jin-Seob [Sound of Spring]

    24. Han Jin-Seob [Sound of Spring]

    Since his days at Hongik University, Jinsup Han stock with stone sculptures with focus on humans. Combining the modernity of western sculptures and traditional characteristics of Korean art, he created modern and Korean sculpture styles. At a glance, his works appear so natural and easy-to-make, but on a more complicated level they also provide the warmth of humans with cold stone pieces, as well as composure and humor, two main characteristics of Korean art.

    * 45x25x50cm | 1991

    25. Park Yeong-Nam [Gogh&MondrianⅡ]

    25. Park Yeong-Nam [Gogh&MondrianⅡ]

    Park Yeong-Nam utilizes colors and rays at the center of his works, making it difficult to categorize the factors into abstract or figurative ones. His screens depict mild splashing like subtle waves, while the musical rhythm on the overlapping duet-like parts provide cheerful thrills. His pictures offer much more impressiveness and thought-provoking experiences than just average paint on a piece of paper.

    * 174x265cm

    26. Eom Tae-Jung [Image of underwater]

    26. Eom Tae-Jung [Image of underwater]

    No one becomes more enchanted with the material attraction of the subject they work on than sculptors. So when an artist chooses metal (copper plate) as their preferred medium, it can be said that they were inseparably in love with the uniqueness of the material. Eom Tae-Jung ’s works feature simplicity and clarity. But the dullness and dryness that can be caused by too much simplicity are countered with contrasting design to create vibrant scenes. Such opposing forms and designs evolve into more dramatic life impulses through material’s characteristics and balanced crafting.

    * 186x90x80cm | 1996

    27. Ha In-Doo [A Bar]

    27. Ha In-Doo [A Bar]

    Ha In-Doo draws the inner self of people – he embodies his different selves to discover the individual aesthetic value hidden inside humans. The colors symbolize the screaming of a person’s inner voice, his confession and wish. Even though the works are contained within the square frame, they show a powerful desire to escape.

    * 127x160cm | 1980

  • Outside

    28. Hyun Hye-Sung [Sound of Forest]

    28. Hyun Hye-Sung [Sound of Forest]

    Almost all works of Hyun Hye-Sung appear to breathe on the ground, together with the ground, and a joyful routine is felt along with the breath of nature. Such harmony between the work and nature is based on the artist’s skillfully honed technique and deep insight into the essence of nature. Most importantly, the works contain the wish of Hyun Hye-Sung to resemble nature.

    * 200x200x220cm | 1994

    29. Kim Su-Hyun [Prayer]

    29. Kim Su-Hyun [Prayer]

    The work is a statue of a woman playing a pipe, sculptured in semi-abstraction method focusing on the beauty of lines. The face is missing, which is a bold attempt to concentrate the viewer’s attention to one spot. The gorgeous lines showing her posture adds composure while appreciating the work. Humans are the most popular subject for sculpture, which is a three-dimensional art, because there is so much diversity and creativity when it comes to the lines and volume of our bodies.

    * 80x70x220cm | 1998

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